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TEXTILE FIBRES/INTRO


source: www.encyclopedia.com/
html/f1/fiber.asp


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textile fibres

Many different fibres are known to be usable; some 40 of these are of commercial importance, and others are of local or specialised use...

  • Fibres may be classified as either natural or synthetic.
    The natural fibres may be further classed according to origin as animal, vegetable, or inorganic fibres;


  • Animal fibres are composed chiefly of proteins; they include silk, wool, and goat hair (known as mohair), llama and alpaca, vicuņa, camel, horse, rabbit, beaver, hog, badger, sable, and other animals.


  • Vegetable fibres are composed chiefly of cellulose and may be classed as short fibres, e.g., cotton and kapok; or long fibres, including flax (used to produce linen), hemp, Manila hemp, istle, ramie, sisal hemp, and Spanish moss.


  • The chief natural inorganic fibre is asbestos. Fibres are also derived from other inorganic substances that can be drawn into threads, e.g., metals (especially gold and silver).


  • Artificial fibres can be produced either by the synthesis of polymers (nylon) or by the alteration of natural fibres (rayon).

  • Here we will concentrate on general demand for textile fibres worldwide and on some of the natural ones: cotton, wool, hemp, silk and linen
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