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hydropower | Canada | reducing pollution


HYDROPOWER:
THE TOP RENEWABLE


source: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/
iea/overview.html


www.undp.org/seed/eap/
activities/wea/drafts-frame.html


europa.eu.int/comm/energy_
transport/atlas/html/hydomark.html


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hydropower

Hydropower* is the most important and widely used renewable source of energy:
  • it represents about 17% of total electricity production worldwide;


  • between 1992 and 2002, the generation of hydroelectric power increased at an average annual rate of 1.8%;


  • small-scale hydro deployment** worldwide is increasing at about 900MW annually and is expected to reach 55,000MW/year by 2010. Rapid expansion is expected in Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
key regional renewables indicators (2000)
countryRenewables
in TPES* %
Hydro %
Africa50.92.3
Asia34.04.0
Latin America27.937.3
China20.28.2
Non-OECD Europe9.946.1
Former USSR3.365.5
Middle East0.841.3
OECD6.234.4
World13.816.5



source: www.iea.org/dbtw-wpd/textbase/papers/2002/leaflet.pdf
TPES: Total primary energy supply.



*Hydropower: electricity generation using the power of falling water, through dams and reservoirs.
** Small-scale hydro schemes are typically defined as having an installed capacity of less than 10MW. They generate electricity by converting the energy available in flowing water (rivers, canals or streams).

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