UNEP UNESCO
home / facts & figures / environment / energy / renewables / geothermal

youthXchange go
RESPECTING OUR BODIES PACKAGING YOURSELF AWAKENING YOUR SOUL LOOKING FOR A PLACE CARRYING THE TORCH CLEAN UP YOUR FUN SOCIAL BELOGING PAY THE RIGHT PRICE LOOKING AHEAD
back to index

GENERAL DATA
ENVIRONMENT
nature conservation
 > areas at risk
 > endangered species
 > protected areas

air
 > air quality
 > global issues

energy
 > demand/supply
 > energy saving
 > renewables

waste
 > production
 > recycling

water
 > water resources
 > drinking water

climate change
 > impact on population
 > weather

animal welfare
 > animal testing
 > unfair practices

BASIC NEEDS
OTHER NEEDS

English site French site Korea site
facts & figures
ENERGY
geothermal | direct heat | progress in Germany | future trends


GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: ELECTRICITY


source: www.undp.org/seed/
eap/activities/wea/drafts-frame.html


iga.igg.cnr.it/geo/geoenergy.php

print this page share with a friend send us your feedback
geothermal

Geothermal energy* is composed of two sectors: heat production and electricity generation.

In absolute numbers, the USA leads the statistics for geothermal electricity generation with 15.5 TWh. However, relative to the electricity requirements of the country, the proportion of electricity generated from geothermal energy represents a mere 0.4%.

In 1998, of the total electricity produced from renewables only 1.6% came from geothermal. Nevertheless, geothermal power plays a fairly significant role in the energy balance of some areas:
  • in 2001, the electric energy produced from geothermal resources represented 27% of the total electricity generated in the Philippines, 16% in Iceland, 12.4% in Kenya, 11.4% in Costa Rica, and 4.3% in El Salvador.


  • Until 2003, geothermal electricity generation in the EU was restricted to Italy. In 2000, electricity generation there was 4.7 TWh, covering around 1.5% of electricity used.


  • 2000 2010: growth in electricity generation is expected to be around 45%, largely because there are many suitable resources in developing countries, whose demand for electricity is increasing.


* Energy from heat stored in rock by the natural heat flow of the Earth.

  related issues

facts & figures > global consumption | energy facts & tips | intro | solar | biomass | hydropower | wind | global warming

department store > carbon calculator

career compass > ashden awards

looking ahead > choose positive energy | climate neutral network

back to the top
[ home | UNEP/UNESCO contact | partners | YXC Team ]