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WASTE
how much is thrown away? | time to change | in your bin | food | paper & cardboard | recycling paper | glass | metals | plastic | textiles | rubber & tires | vehicles | e-waste


WHAT’S IN YOUR BIN?


source: www.wastewatch.org.uk

www.epa.gov/msw

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in your bin

Did you know that from 50 to over 80% of the contents of your bin (1) could be recycled?
  • According to Cemagref (2), a typical European bin contains 23% organic products (animal and vegetal), 33% paper/cardboard, 5% plastic, 8% glass, 8% metals, 3% textile, 13% various (china, dust…). But also within Europe the situation is not homogeneous. For example, according to Waste Watch in UK the typical contents of a dustbin are: 33.2% paper, 20.2 vegetables, 11.2 plastics, 9.9 misc., 9.35 glass, 7.3 metals, 6.8% dust, 2.1 textiles;


  • the weekly waste output of the average US citizen – at 14.3 kg - is the highest in the world. According to EPA, in 2001 the breakdown of municipal solid waste (MSW) by weight was: 36% paper products, 12% yard trimmings, glass, metals, plastics, wood, and food scraps between 5 and 12% each, rubber, leather and textiles combined made up about 7% (3).
Best options for the environment…
  • reduce the amount of waste that is produced, failing that we should re-use as much as possible;


  • when both of these options have been exhausted then recycling or composting is preferred.

(1) The exact percentage depends on your purchasing choices and consuming behaviours.

(2) French public agricultural and environmental research institute.


(3) Data have been rounded.


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carrying the torch > environment’s caretakers | consumers school

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