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WASTE OF FOODSTUFF


source: archive.greenpeace.org/
~geneng/reports/animalprod.pdf


www.worldwatch.org/press/news/
1998/07/02/


www.vegetarismus.ch/info/eoeko.htm

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waste of foodstuff

During the transformation from plant into animal protein a lot of nutritious matter is wasted…
  • 1 kilo of beef (liveweight) requires 7 kg of high-protein feedstuffs;


  • 4 kg of grain fed to pigs produce 1 kg of pork liveweight;


  • in six weeks, a broiler chick needs just over 2 kg of feed to achieve 1 kg liveweight.
Inefficient 'protein conversion'
  • globally, some 670 million tons of cereals are used as livestock feed each year. This represents just over 1/3 of total world cereal use (36.9% in 2003-2004, according to the World Resources Institute);


  • 40% of cereals are fed to livestock in the United States whereas only 14% are fed in Africa;*


  • grain used for feed in China jumped more than fivefold in the past two decades. Since 1960, the share of Chinese grain going to livestock tripled from 8% to 26%. In Mexico, the share jumped from 5% to 45% over the same period, and in Egypt, from 3 to 31%. Even in Thailand, where meat intake remains low, the share of grain fed to livestock surged from less than 1% in 1960 to 30% in 1997;


  • each kilo of meat represents several kilos of grain, either corn or wheat, that could be consumed directly by humans. Thanks to this artificial extension of the food-chain, among other things, we loose: 90% protein; 99% carbohydrates; 100% fibre;


  • moreover, only a small portion of the body of a slaughtered animal is utilised: 35% of the weight of a cow; 39% of a calf (without bones).

* Data from FAOSTAT.

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