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BUY NOTHING DAY


website:
www.buynothingday.co.uk/index.html

buy nothing day
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what: the concept couldn't be simpler. As a symbolic protest, on the busiest shopping day of the year, you refuse to participate in the consumer frenzy that has become everyday life. 24 hours, no purchases. Buy Nothing Day is a global stand off from consumerism - celebrated as a holiday by some and street party by others! We'll feel de-toxed from shopping and realise how much it uses up our free time. Anyone can take part provided they spend a day without spending. The campaign wants us to make a commitment to consuming less, recycling more and challenging corporations to clean up and be fair. Modern consumerism might offer great choices, but this shouldn't be at the cost of the environment or developing countries.

where did it come from? Buy Nothing Day was started in 1993 by the founders of AdBusters in Canada and is now an international event celebrated in over 55 countries.

the challenge: Buy Nothing Day exposes the environmental and ethical consequences of consumerism. The developed countries - only 20% of the world population - are consuming over 80% of the earth's natural resources, causing a disproportionate level of environmental damage and unfair distribution of wealth. Moreover, large companies increasingly use labour in developing countries to produce goods because itís cheaper and there aren't the systems to protect workers that there are in the West. Moreover, the raw materials and production methods that are used to make so many of our goods have harmful side-effects such as toxic waste, destruction of wild life, and wasted energy. The transport of goods internationally also contributes to pollution, especially when many of them can be produced locally. As consumers, we should question the products we buy and the companies who produce them. The idea is to stop and think about the way what and how much we buy effects the environment and developing countries.

when: The initiative took place on November 27th, 2004 in Europe and on November 26th, 2004 in Canada/USA. It is usually launched in November every year.


contacts

AdBusters1243 West 7th AvenueVancouver, BCV6H 1B7 Canadaph 604.736.9401fax 604.737.6021
bnd@adbusters.org
 
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