UNEP UNESCO
home / facts & figures / basic needs / housing / home quality / women / policies / best practices / tricky facts

youthXchange go
RESPECTING OUR BODIES PACKAGING YOURSELF AWAKENING YOUR SOUL LOOKING FOR A PLACE CARRYING THE TORCH CLEAN UP YOUR FUN SOCIAL BELOGING PAY THE RIGHT PRICE LOOKING AHEAD
back to index

GENERAL DATA
ENVIRONMENT
BASIC NEEDS
nutrition
 > food demand/supply
 > food safety
 > consumers information

health
 > health system
 > health/lifestyles
 > health/environment
 > HIV/AIDS

housing
 > demand/supply
 > home quality
 > urban overview

education
 > access & participation
 > resources

labour
 > people rights
 > behind products

OTHER NEEDS

English site French site Korea site
facts & figures
HOUSING
slums | context | slums' map | causes | more & more slums | living conditions | women | policies | best practices | tricky facts


SLUMS/ TRICKY FACTS


source: http://www.unhabitat.org/
content.asp?cid=3008&
catid=555&typeid=6
&subMenuId=0


print this page share with a friend send us your feedback
tricky facts

If the apathy that has pervaded and impeded slum policy to date is to be overcome, many of the misconceptions and myths about slums and slum dwellers must also be shattered. For example, did you know that…?
  • in the 19th century, industrialisation in Europe and America led to rapid urbanisation. The population of London went from about 800,000 in 1800 to over 6.5 million in 1900; during the same period, Paris grew from one-half to over 3 million; and by 1900 New York’s population had swelled to 4.2 million. This explosion meant that the poor lived in dark, airless and unsanitary tenements, often without windows, where they were regularly exploited by rapacious landlords and politicians;


  • in India, more than 41% of Kolkata’s slum households have lived in slums for more than 30 years; more than 70% of the households have lived in slums for more than 15 years; 16% of the population has been living in slums for 6 to 15 years; new entrants into slums, with duration of stay of up to 5 years, constitute only 4% of the slum population;


  • all slum households in Bangkok have a colour television; the average number of TVs per household is 1.6; almost all of the households have a refrigerator; 2/3 of the households have a washing machine and 1.5 cell phones;


  • while most slum dwellers are dependent on the informal sector for their livelihoods, slum populations in many parts of the world (for example in Pune, India and Ibadan, Nigeria) quite often include university lecturers, university students, government civil servants and formal private sector employees;


  • slums are also places in which the vibrant mixing of different cultures has frequently resulted in new forms of artistic expression, including some of the major musical and dance movements of the twentieth century, such as jazz, blues, rock and roll, reggae, funk, hiphop, soukuss, breakdance, fado and flamenco.
back to the top
[ home | UNEP/UNESCO contact | partners | YXC Team ]