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pay the right price
FAIR & RESPECTFUL

MAKE FAIR TRADE,
BUY FAIR TRADE



website: www.oxfam.com

www.maketradefair.com

oxfam campaign
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intro: “Did you know that every time you buy something made or grown in a developing country, you take part in a billion pound scam? As it works today, the global trading system rips off people who are already poor. You don't want it. They certainly don't want it. Together, we can change it” : this critical sentence is part of an important campaign promoted by Oxfam International and its 12 affiliates, a well-known global movement which fights for labourers’ rights and calls for an end to unfair trade rules.

what: Fair Trade is a growing, international movement which ensures that producers in poor countries get a fair deal. This means a fair price for their goods (one that covers the cost of production and guarantees a living income), long-term contracts, which provide real security, and for many, support to gain the knowledge and skills that they need to develop their businesses and increase sales.

In the past decade, the fair trade movement has really taken off, as consumer awareness of - and indignation at - the treatment of producers in poor countries has increased. More retailers than ever are stocking fair trade goods, the number of products on offer continues to grow as demand increases, and more poor communities are reaping the benefits.

Make Trade Fairis the name of the campaign and a related website calling on governments, institutions and multinational companies to change the rules so that trade can become part of the solution to poverty, not part of the problem.
Maketradefair.com gives a voice to the farmers, labourers and factory workers who are being cheated by the blatantly unfair rules of world trade. But it also gives a voice to consumers who want to support fair trade.

stop unfair trade! Buy fair trade products, Oxfam suggests, - and you can add your voice to the ‘big noise’. The fair trade movement gives consumers an opportunity to use their purchasing power to tilt the balance, however slightly, in favour of the poor. But fair trade alone can't address the crisis. This can only be achieved by changing the unfair rules of world trade so that they work for small-scale producers as well as rich multinationals.

success stories/chocolate: we eat an estimated 60 billion dollars worth of chocolate every year. But thanks to a long-term decline in world prices, millions of families whose livelihoods depend on cocoa production are facing extreme poverty. The Kuapa Kokoo co-operative in the Ashanti region in the heart of Ghana's cocoa-belt is working with fair trade organisations to challenge the system. It is helping its 35,000 members to get their fair share of the profits generated by cocoa.

When Kuapa sells to its fair share partners in Europe, it receives a guaranteed minimum price as well as a 'social premium', which is invested in community projects such as building wells and schools. And when the price for cocoa drops - as it has been generally doing for the past 20 years - Kuapa's farmers still have a secure income.

coffee rescue plan is part of the campaign to Make Trade Fair. Oxfam estimates that as a result of improved corporate behaviour, poor coffee farmers in over 50 developing countries have benefited by an approximately £9 million (about 13.63 million euro) increase in income – a tangible benefit of the campaign. But clearly there is much more work still to be done by the coffee industry. The four big coffee companies - Nestlé, Kraft, Procter & Gamble and Sara Lee - make big profits while coffee farmers are receiving the lowest prices in 100 years. Oxfam has analysed and scored each of the 'Big Four' coffee companies on the actions they take to help solve the global coffee crisis. Oxfam scored none of them better than ‘failure’.


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