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RESPECTING OUR BODIES PACKAGING YOURSELF AWAKENING YOUR SOUL LOOKING FOR A PLACE CARRYING THE TORCH CLEAN UP YOUR FUN SOCIAL BELOGING PAY THE RIGHT PRICE LOOKING AHEAD
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 > just one planet
 > old is gold
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commitment tracks
 > sustainable tourism
 > sustainability IQ
 > take it personally!
 > use less, get more!


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test & play
COMMITMENT TRACKS
save it for tomorrow | eco-design


SAVE IT FOR TOMORROW


B beginners
A advanced
YXC HELP link to the relevant information.

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Designers should define their role broadly as agents of good in the world, and limit their work to 'legitimate' products: those that are needed, and those that can be made without damage to nature or - through the unethical actions of manufacturers and investors - damage to people.
PHILIPPE STARCK, industrial designer

We live in a world that is filled with stuff, objects, buildings… The trend to over-consumption, which is a characteristic of the developed countries, has environmental and social consequences for the all planet. Recycled or recyclable materials, durability, minimal-waste packaging, easy-disassembling elements, renewable resources, eco-friendly technologies, sustainable building, energy-efficient engineering, and environmentally responsible design are major challenges in nowadays societies. A sustainable lifestyle means targeted consumption that privilege products and services with a minimal ‘cradle to grave’ impact on the environment: from energy-saving devices to eco-friendly materials… Test yourself!

  • the Biothinking quiz – Product Design [www.biothinking.com/quiz.htm], is a multiple-choice quiz to discover some basic principles that every eco-designer should take in consideration before creating a product: from eco-labels, to what 'organic' means… or how many years did it take to make the amount of fossil fuel that we burn each year, and so on. Answer the questions and start ‘thinking green’! (B)
  • YXC propose you to take a trip in the world of ECO-DESIGN. Learn more about the geographic origin of a material, the way a product has been manufactured, the healthiness of its components, the energy needed to produce it; the amount of waste it can produce. Is it easy to dismantle? Does it use the largest possible number of recycled materials? Is it recyclable? With respect to use: is it healthy and safe? Does it allow an easy use/access for everybody (children, elderly, disabled people)? Does it stimulate harmful behaviours with regard to health or the environment? Does it suggest discriminatory behaviours (racism, exclusions, sexual discrimination, and intolerance)? Come with us and test your knowledge through a true or false quiz about what ‘cradle to grave’ means, eco-friendly materials, energy-efficient systems… (A)
  • A design for the environment (DfE) approach considers the environment at a product's design phase, including all materials and energy requirements and their effects over the life cycle of the product. Engineers play a crucial role in creating the world's infrastructure and carrying out projects that meet human needs. What is the ISO certification? What does it mean LCA? Go at the Sustainable Engineering quiz [www.professionalpractice.asme.org/business_functions/suseng/quiz2.htm] and challenge yourself with a technical test that will broaden your knowledge on sustainable development. (A)
YXC help
department store/community services ECOLABEL CATALOGUE | CORP. WATCH | linksECO ETHICAL FASHION GOODS | FASHION SUSTAINABLE DESIGN | INTERIOR DESIGN | ECO DESIGN | ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN | INDUSTRIAL DESIGN | TEXTILE & FASHION DESIGN| CONSUMERS’ RIGHTS| ECO & ETHICAL LABELS|links/sustainable design
  • Many companies are reaping both environmental and economic benefits by implementing the latest energy efficient building and lighting controls. In fact, overall energy performance of a building can account for up to ten LEED points, and on-site renewable energy can garner up to three LEED points. Using green and energy efficient building and lighting controls can boost your bottom line on a variety of levels. Take the Building + Lighting Controls quiz [www.edcmag.com/CDA/Archives/3632a2c01a697010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0] to see how knowledgeable you are when it comes to building and lighting controls. (A)
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